The illegal wildlife trade (IWT) reaches far beyond the international conservation agenda, attracting concern because of its links to organised crime and national security. There is no one solution to combatting wildlife crime, but increasingly practitioners and policy makers are recognising the need to engage rural communities that neighbour or live with wildlife as key partners. Our database contains case study summaries of community-level interventions that aim to tackle the illegal wildlife trade, as well as overviews of the national policy context for IWT and community engagement. You can contribute your case studies and help this database become a useful resource for practitioners and policymakers.

Enter your search terms in the box above (e.g. a country or species name), or browse case studies by country using the map below.

Recent

Combatting the illegal trade in ploughshare tortoises is a new project funded by the Darwin Initiative's Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund. The project began in 2014 and will continue to 2017.

Country/Countries: 

Species of focus: 

The central aim of this Darwin Initiative funded project (from 2007-2010) was to re-establish effective capacity, systems and motivation for the conservation of the endangered one horned Asian rhinoceros and associated Terai grassland habitat in Nepal. The attention to the community was focused o

Country/Countries: 

Species of focus: 

The Buffer Zone concept was promulgated by the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation in Nepal in 1993 for certain protected areas to encourage the local communities to be more reliant on economic activities within such a zone rather than illegally exploiting the resources inside

Country/Countries: 

Species of focus: 

In 2005 the innovative Rhino Custodianship Programme established by Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism spearheaded a large-scale initiative to achieve biological management and rural development goals by restoring the black rhinoceros to its historical rangelands, while meeting an emer

Country/Countries: 

Species of focus: 

Surviving Together was initially implemented in Myanmar and worked with park authorities and local communities to stop poaching and to shore up protected areas. The programme used a four pronged approach:

Country/Countries: 

Species of focus: 

The Kasigau Corridor REDD project in southeastern Kenya is designed to bring direct financing for carbon emissions reduction to communities while securing the wildlife migration corridor between Tsavo East and Tsavo West National Parks through which over 500 African elephants migrate seasonally.

Country/Countries: 

Species of focus: 

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) has helped the government of Indonesia protect tigers by protecting livestock (mostly goats) from tiger attacks in villages near the Bukit Barison Selatan National Park in southwestern Sumatra.

Country/Countries: 

Species of focus: 

The Khama Rhino Sanctuary Trust (KRST) is one Community-Based Organisation (CBO) of many in Botswana. It was set up to promote rural development in the country by involving communities in tourism and conservation activities.

Country/Countries: 

Species of focus: 

The Chinese pangolin has the dubious accolade of being the world’s most illegally traded mammal.

Country/Countries: 

Species of focus: 

Vicuña are endangered camelids – listed on CITES Appendix II and I – whose ranges cover the Andean countries of South America. Poaching levels have dropped dramatically following coordinated trade regulations and the rise in local management initiatives.

Country/Countries: 

Species of focus: 

Pages