The illegal wildlife trade (IWT) reaches far beyond the international conservation agenda, attracting concern because of its links to organised crime and national security. There is no one solution to combatting wildlife crime, but increasingly practitioners and policy makers are recognising the need to engage rural communities that neighbour or live with wildlife as key partners. Our database contains case study summaries of community-level interventions that aim to tackle the illegal wildlife trade, as well as overviews of the national policy context for IWT and community engagement. You can contribute your case studies and help this database become a useful resource for practitioners and policymakers.

Enter your search terms in the box above (e.g. a country or species name), or browse case studies by country using the map below.

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The fate of American crocodile populations in Colombia suffered dramatically from a prolonged period of heavy trade in skins that started in 1928. During the next five decades, the species was practically razed from its natural habitats.

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Endemic to Madagascar, the ploughshare tortoise is a victim of its exotic appearance. Its high domed golden shell is much sought after by collectors and rare animal enthusiasts whose demands drive an illegal trade that has pushed the tortoise to the brink of extinction in the wild.

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In response to the escalating threat from poachers, communities in Namibia’s north western region are themselves the catalyst in an initiative to strengthen their commitment and capacity to protect the last truly wild population of Black Rhino.

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The project started in 2001 and brings together communities, the African Wildlife Foundation, Big Life Foundation, Kenya Wildlife Service, Tanzania Wildlife Division and Tanzania National Parks.

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The Ruvuma Elephant Project was established in 2011, organised by the not for profit organisation PAMS Foundation.

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Elephants, big cats and Maasai giraffe are among the species to benefit from the community conservancy initiative in which local landowners are paid to protect wildlife in a key corridor on the south east boundary of the Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya.

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Community conservancies are proving increasingly effective as partners in the fight against ivory poachers in Kenya. In the north of the country, conservancies now manage more than 2.5 million hectares of community land, much of it critical range for the African elephant.

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The size of Switzerland, Gourma is an extensive and remote area where rule of law is weak. Government enforcement agencies are tarnished by corruption and have virtually no capacity or resources. With such poor official protection, local community support for elephant conservation is crucial.

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