Tanzania

Community involvement policy context: 

Under Tanzanian wildlife legislation, all wiildlife belongs to the state. The wildlife policy of 1998 however introduced the concetp of WIldlife Management Areas (WMAs) which grant wildlife user rights to communities that establish WMAs on Village Land. ~In late 2002, the government released the Wildlife Conservation (Wildlife Management Areas)
Regulations and, in January 2003, formally launched the WMAs process. The regulations detail the rights and responsibilities of communities, government powers and uthorities, and the procedure for establishing a WMA.

National policy context for IWT: 

Under Tanzanian wildlife legislation (key pieces include the Wildlife Conservation Act 2009 and the National Parks Act 2002 in mainland Tanzania) The Wildlife Conservation Act 2009 and the National Parks Act 2002 are the governing laws in mainland Tanzania, while in Zanzibar, the governing law is the Forest Resources Management and Conservation Act 1996) there are 4 categories of wildlife crime: (1) hunting offences; (2) trading offences; (3) licensing offences; and (4) damaging offences. Penalties for such offences include revocation/suspension of licenses and/or permits, confiscation of property, monetary fines up to 500,000 TSH and terms of imprisonment from 6 months to 7 years. The most serious offences are hunting offences against Part 1 animals which can result in a penalty of monetary fines of up to 500,000 TSH and 7 years imprisonment.

Tanzania has been party to CITES since 1979

Tanzania has been party to CITES since 1979

The project started in 2001 and brings together communities, the African Wildlife Foundation, Big Life Foundation, Kenya Wildlife Service, Tanzania Wildlife Division and Tanzania National Parks.

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Species of focus: 

The Ruvuma Elephant Project was established in 2011, organised by the not for profit organisation PAMS Foundation.

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